LINE UP CAPESTHORNE HALL, CHESHIRE
3RD - 5TH AUGUST

THE LINE UP IS HERE

We are proud to present to you the biggest line up of artists to ever grace the Rewind Festival stage!

THE JACKSONS • OMD • BILLY OCEAN

THE BOOMTOWN RATS • MARC ALMOND • HOWARD JONES

SOUL II SOUL • HEAVEN 17 • BONNIE TYLER • MIDGE URE

STEVE HARLEY & COCKNEY REBEL • THE UNDERTONES • LEO SAYER

TIFFANY • BIG COUNTRY • HUE & CRY • THE FIZZ • WENDY JAMES OF TRANSVISION VAMP •

KIM APPLEBY • IMAGINATION • ROACHFORD • CAPTAIN SENSIBLE • MUSICAL YOUTH • DOCTOR & THE MEDICS


WITH FURTHER ENTERTAINMENT FROM...

MILTON JONES • MICK FERRY • MRS BARBARA NICE

MARTIN KEMP (80S DJ SET) • NORMAN JAY MBE

MAGIC NOSTALGIC • RHYTHM OF THE 90'S • EIGHT RAY MUSIC PRESENTS!

RAY GUNS LOOK REAL ENOUGH • ROCK CHOIR

ULTIMATE SILENT DISCO • MUSICAL BINGO • JOHN LEATHER'S 80'S MOVIE DISCO

BANG BANG'S BIG BREAKFAST • GUILTY PLEASURES PRESENTS! • MASSAOKE

Artists listed below in reverse order of performance on each day

SATURDAY
The Jacksons

Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Marlon and Michael, five brothers from Gary, Indiana, known originally as the Jackson 5 and later The Jacksons, rose to fame for their combination of extraordinary musical talent and spectacular choreography. They soon earned the status of pop royalty in the music world, providing the launching pad for what would become Michael Jackson’s legendary solo career. First signed to Steeltown Records, the group soon found international success at Motown with the songs: "I Want You Back", "ABC", "The Love You Save" and "I'll Be There", making history in 1970 as the first recording act whose first four singles reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100. They ultimately scored 17 top forty singles on the Hot 100, following with hits such as "Never Can Say Goodbye" and "Dancing Machine". To date, their Motown recordings alone have sold in excess of 200 million records. In 1976, the group, except for Jermaine, left Motown for Epic Records where, they added their brother Randy and changed their name to The Jacksons. They released five albums between 1976 and 1981, including the hit albums, Destiny (1978) and Triumph (1980) from which they produced the smash singles, "Enjoy Yourself", "Shake Your Body (Down to the Ground)" and "Can You Feel It." In 1983, the band, along with Jermaine performed on Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever and subsequently released the Victory album the following year. When the brothers united for The Victory Tour in 1984, it became the highest-grossing concert series ever staged in the United States. The group can be said to find many of its music inspirations in groups like The Temptations, The Supremes, James Brown and Frankie Lymon & The Teenagers and, in turn, came to eventually serve as the inspiration for several generations of boy bands, including Backstreet Boys, New Edition, N*SYNC, New Kids on the Block, and of more recent vintage, the Jonas Brothers, One Direction, and many more. In 1980, The Jacksons were honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. They were inducted into The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997 and the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 1999 as The Jackson 5. Listed among The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's "500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll" are two of the group’s songs "I Want You Back” and "ABC". At the annual BMI Urban Awards on September 8, 2008, The Jacksons were honored as BMI Icons. In 2016, “ABC” joined “I Want You Back” as the group’s second recording to be inducted into the Recording Academy’s Grammy Hall of Fame.

MARC ALMOND

Born in Southport in 1957, Marc Almond is an internationally acclaimed music artist. He has sold over 30 million records worldwide and is an icon and influence to a generation of musicians.

 

Marc did a General Art and Design course at Southport Art College before going on to get a 2:1 degree at Leeds Polytechnic Fine Art Department studying Performance Art and Film.

 

Marc met David Ball at Leeds Art College and formed the internationally successful 'electro duo' Soft Cell in 1979. They went on to record four albums and their single Tainted Love broke all records as the track that remained the longest in the US Billboard Top 100 and received a Brit award for best single of that year.

 

Soft Cell parted amicably in 1984 to pursue solo projects.

 

Marc recorded the innovative and influential double album Torment and Toreros with Marc and the Mambas which put Marc in a unique musical place that had one foot in mainstream and the other in the underground.

 

A diverse and hugely successful solo career followed with over a dozen musical albums and a second number one single, Something’s Gotten Hold of My Heart in 1989 with 60’s Legend Gene Pitney.

 

Marc has been awarded the Ivor Novello Inspiration Award and the Icon Award by Attitude Magazine a Mojo Magazine Inspiration Award and was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of Leeds Music College.  He is also dubbed in the Russian press, 'adopted son of Russia' after the release of Heart on Snow his album of Russian ‘Romance ‘Songs and Russian Folk and Orpheus In Exile, the songs of the late Russian Gypsy Romance singer, dissident and now gay icon Vadim Kozin, in 2009. The album sold in excess of 45,000 copies and received rapturous reviews.

 

As well as a huge body of recordings, Marc has also had two best selling autobiographies, Tainted Life and In Search of The Pleasure Palace, as well as three books of verse; The Angel of Death in the Adonis Lounge, A Beautiful Twisted Night and The End of New York.

 

Almond is no stranger to the theatrical stage. His credits include Ten Plagues, winner of The Scotman's Fringe First Award and Almond was highly praised for his role of Seneca in Paris Théâtre du Châtelet's experimental rock adaptation of Poppea.

 

Marc’s latest solo album, The Velvet Trail, was released in March 2015 and was closely followed by a sell out European live tour. In November 2015 Marc together with Poet Jeremy Reed and Composer Othon made an album of Pop Operetta, Against Nature, based on the book A Rebours by J K Husymans and funded through Kickstarter.

 

Marc performed with Leeds College of Music Contemporary Orchestra and Pop Choir at The Royal Festival Hall in July 2016.

 

November 2016 saw the release of Trials of Eyeliner, Marc’s much anticipated box set anthology released through Universal Music.

 

Marc released ‘Hits and Pieces’ through Universal in March 2017 to celebrate his Greatest Hits. Shortly following this top ten album was a UK sold out tour.

 

Marc looks forward to releasing yet another album in September 2017 which will be followed by a 20 date UK Tour.

 

leo sayer

It’s no wonder that Leo Sayer is considered a music business legend.

43 years since his first album, he’s had 5 worldwide No.1 hits, is a Grammy winning songwriter, and is considered one of the world’s most thrilling and entertaining live performers.

Born in Shoreham By Sea, West Sussex, he now lives in Australia, where he tours, performs and currently records. He’s just released his 13th studio album ‘Restless Years’, which he produced and wrote all the songs for. He feels he’s as prolific now as he’s ever been, with no thoughts of slowing down.

Leo’s career started in 1972, when he met David Courtney through an audition in his home city of Brighton. Leo and David started writing songs together, and took these to Adam Faith, who himself had been a legendary pop singing icon the 50’s and 60’s. Adam saw Leo’s potential immediately, and producing his first albums with David, steered the singer songwriter to almost instant success with 1973’s ‘Silverbird’, Leo’s debut album release. On the cover Leo was memorably dressed and made up as a white faced Pierrot, singing ‘The Show Must Go On’.

But that wasn’t the first success for the trio of Leo, Adam and David, as a few months earlier they’d masterminded a solo album for The Who’s Roger Daltrey. This introduced Leo to the world as the writer of “Giving It All Away”, which went straight into the U.S. and U.K. Top ten.

The same song gave Leo the title for his second album ‘Just A Boy’ which became a major success worldwide with the hit singles ‘Long Tall Glasses’ and ‘One Man Band’ in 1974.

By now, to add to all the success he’d had at home, Leo was visiting the U.S.A., Australia, Europe and the Far East as an international concert headliner. Back home, he released his third album, ‘Another Year’, featuring his third top 5 single ‘Moonlighting’.

In 1976 Leo met producer Richard Perry in Los Angeles. Richard produced three chart-topping albums for Leo. By now Leo was living in the States, composing with co writers like Barry Mann, Tom Snow, Albert Hammond, Michael Omartian, and Vini Poncia, and at the peak of his career.

You Make Me Feel Like Dancing” was a rapid U.S. No.1 followed up by more chart toppers with “When I Need You” and “How Much Love”, all these from the multi platinum album ‘Endless Flight’. They followed this up with ‘Thunder In My Heart’ (1977) including “Thunder In My Heart” and “Easy To Love”, and ‘Leo Sayer’ (1978) which had ‘Raining In My Heart’ and ‘I Can’t Stop Loving You (Though I Try)’ as hit singles.

Back in the U.K., Leo was a major celebrity, his songs featured on movies and commercials, starring in his own TV series and playing concerts for The Queen.

His old friend David Courtney produced ‘Here’ in LA in 1979, and 1980 found Leo working in London with co writer and producer Alan Tarney on ‘Living In A Fantasy’. From this came the classic ‘More Than I Can Say’ which gave Leo another giant international hit that year in the U.S., as well as becoming Leo’s most popular song in Asia. Leo and Alan were also responsible for writing a big hit for Cliff Richard with ‘Dreamin’, and Leo’s own ‘Orchard Road’ single in 1983.

During the 80’s Leo also made the albums ‘World Radio’ with producer Arif Mardin, and ‘Have You Ever Been In Love’ with Christopher Neil.

Being major draw across the globe at this time, Leo toured extensively throughout the 80’s and 90’s, performing at venues in places as widespread as Tokyo, South Africa, New Zealand, Scandinavia, Hawaii, Las Vegas, Alaska, Moscow, Saudi Arabia, Canada and Vietnam. He really fit the definition of worldwide superstar.

During 2005 he was in Denmark self producing ‘Voice In My Head’, and in 2006, a DJ called Meck put a remix of Leo’s ‘Thunder In My Heart’ up to the top of the UK singles chart, his second UK No.1.

In the last ten years since moving down-under he hasn’t stopped working, still paying frequent visits to the UK and Europe and wherever his audiences still demand his performance.

Now he’s back in the UK again for the RESTLESS YEARS 2015 tour. To quote Leo’s very first hit: ‘The Show Must Go On’!

kim appleby

Singer/songwriter Kim Appleby was part of the sister duo ‘Mel & Kim’, two East London girls from Hackney who were loved for their cockney charm as well as their cutting edge style. In 1986 they set the charts alight with their first single ‘Showing Out (Get Fresh At The Weekend)’ which was followed by the international hit ‘Respectable’, a number one hit in the UK and worldwide. Other singles followed, such as ‘F.L.M.’ and ‘That’s The Way It Is’ and the album F.L.M went gold, selling 3.5 million copies worldwide. Mel & Kim were also nominated for a ‘Best Newcomer’ award at The Brits.

 

Tragically, Mel was diagnosed with cancer and lost her battle in January 1990. Kim returned as a solo artist, releasing her self-titled album, ‘Kim Appleby’ which featured the hit single, ‘Don't worry’ which was nominated for an Ivor Novello Award.

 

Kim then decided that she wanted to take a break as an artist and concentrate purely on songwriting for other acts. As a result she spent some time in Sweden working with top songwriter ‘Anders Bagge’, co-founder of the famous ‘Murlyn Music Group’. She has also collaborated with Michael Garvin (Never Give Up On A Good Thing) as well as Shep Soloman (Britney Spears, Kelly Clarkson, Natalie Imbruglia).

 

Kim now works closely with the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors (BASCA) and has chaired the Ivor Novello Awards judges panel for ‘Best Contemporary Song’ for ten years, and previously the ‘Best Song Musically and Lyrically’ for two years. She is also deputy chair of the Ivor Novello awards committee and currently sits on the Songwriters Executive Committee at BASCA and remains a keen champion of songwriter’s rights.

 

In 2015, Kim met Dominic King who has composed songs for Sister Sledge, Chaka Khan, Cher, The Three Degrees and many more. Together they decided to collaborate and out of this collaboration came an album of fresh songs. The first single is due to be released in spring 2017 with an album to follow in the summer.

tiffany

Tiffany’s iconic number one hit single I Think We're Alone Now captured the heart of a nation and catapulted her to pop superstardom. The singer and songwriter’s latest full- length album A Million Miles was released in early 2016. Tiffany teamed with the cutting edge entertainment platform Pledge Music, which allowed fans a unique and personal look into the creation of the album. A Million Miles marks the first time Tiffany has been a co-producer on her own record. Tiffany launches her West Coast Tour in March, 2017.

The legendary pop star has earned Two #1 hit singles I Think We're Alone Now and Could’ve Been, and set the record as the youngest female artist to top the Billboard charts with her debut album and the youngest to have 2 back to back #1 hits. In 2000 Billboard Magazine described Tiffany’s album The Color of Silence as “thoughtful, intelligent, and full of grace” and ranked it among the “Top Ten Best Albums of the Year”. She has sold over 15 million albums to date.

After two massively successful albums and world tours, at age 21 her priorities shifted. She gave birth to her son Elijah and wanted to raise him out of the spotlight but she never stopped writing music. In 2008 the family relocated to Nashville where she became immersed in the tight knit songwriting community. The creative atmosphere brought her back to her roots as a young girl singing the songs of Loretta Lynn and Tammy Wynette while dreaming of becoming a country singer. At age nine she began performing with her own band and was discovered by legendary country songwriters Hoyt and Mae Axton.

The pair took ten year old Tiffany to Nashville where she opened for country stars appeared on local TV shows. This helped inspire her to create her country-pop EP Rose Tattoo, to tell the stories of her early music career before she found success in pop music.

Tiffany obtained a long and storied career in a short amount of time, and today her goal is to continue writing songs for herself and others, cementing her status in the industry as a powerhouse hit maker and go-to songwriter.

Tiffany has guest stared on reality TV shows such as Food Network’s Rachael Ray VS. Guy: Celebrity Cook Off, ABC’s Celebrity Wife Swap, VH1’s Celebrity Fit Club, A&E’s Celebrity Ghost Stories and Food Network Challenge. She also headlined Good Morning America’s Summer Concert Series. As an actress Tiffany starred in SyFy Channel’s hit and campy movie’s Mega Piranha and Mega Python vs Gatoroid, in which the sci-fi disaster movie had her feuding with fellow pop star Debbie Gibson.

Tiffany stays very involved in her local Nashville community. She is an official spokesperson for The American Heart Association. She takes great pride in mentoring young singers and artists, and provides these aspiring musicians with guidance and advice on how to break into and navigate the music industry. With her husband Benn

they share their love of animals with their 8 rescue dogs, and Tiffany often gives back by producing charity concerts for the Humane Society.

For someone who has spent her life touring around the world, it’s surprising to discover Tiffany’s extreme fear of flying. Consequently the singer is always in her car and it’s in the car where she gets her inspiration and does most of her writing. Those personal journals and stories inspired both the new music and to name her album after all those miles she’s driven… A Million Miles.

the fizz

Early in 1981, four complete strangers sat in the  drawing room of a house in Fulham and were told: "you are now Bucks Fizz".

 

In the eight weeks between that first meeting and appearing on "A Song for Europe" on 11th March 1981, Bucks Fizz were hurled into a melee of rehearsing, recording, routining, styling, interviews and photography.  All that hard work and effort was to pay dividends - they went on to win the Song For Europe and Eurovision Song Contest 1981 and became household names around the world.

 

With over 20 singles released over the next few years including 3 number ones, "My Camera Never Lies", "Land Of Make Believe" and of course, "Making Your Mind Up", they sold in excess of 15 million records, spending 219 weeks in the UK charts alone!

 

Over the years, each member of Bucks Fizz went their own way but in 2008, Cheryl, Mike and Jay were reunited for a television show, "Pop Goes The Band" . Along with Bobby McVay, himself “Eurovision Royalty”, having represented the UK in the 1983 Eurovision Song Contest with the group, Sweet Dreams, and the song, “I’m Never Giving Up”,  they can now be seen at festivals, eighties weekends, private functions and theatres regularly throughout the UK and beyond.  This year has been   their busiest for years with  UK tours and  countless retro festivals across the UK.

 

Mike Stock has produced a new single and album with them  – The F-Z of Pop – which was Album of The Week on BBC Radio 2 and entered the Top 40 at  number 25.

 

If you love the eighties and want to sing and dance to pure eighties pop music, watch all the familiar routines, hear the harmonies that Bucks Fizz are famous for and re-live that iconic moment when the skirts were ripped off, then THE FIZZ is that band!

captain sensible

Best known as a co-founder (with Chris Miller, aka Rat Scabies) of the punk band the Damned, Raymond Burns, aka Captain Sensible, is one of the most beguiling and talented individuals to emerge from the punk era. Ironically, he never sought a separate career from that of the Damned, but success with a series of singles, coupled with extended periods of inactivity by the band, made it a foregone conclusion that he would become a star in his own right. In the early '80s, Captain Sensible put together a group of his own called King, which lasted all of three months before breaking up. He later sang on the single "Jet Boy Jet Girl" and appeared on Johnny Moped's Cycledelic album. He was signed to A&M as a solo artist, and had a number one British hit with the old musical number "Happy Talk." He followed it up with an original, "Glad It's All Over," an antiwar song about the Falklands; for a time, he was also hooked up with Robyn Hitchcock. By this time, his status as a member of the Damned made him a regular topic of coverage in the British music press, and he became well-known for various beliefs, including devoted vegetarianism and an opposition to war, which he presented in bitingly satirical fashion.
Captain Sensible proved more charming than any other veteran of the punk scene. His 1985 vegetarian-oriented single "Wot! No Meat?" was a success, and over the years he also recorded a series of albums, The Power of Love(1983), Revolution Now (1989), and The Universe of Geoffrey Brown (1993), that were good sellers and critical favorites, though only in England -- in an era in which the Damned were little more than a cult act on the other side of the Atlantic, Captain Sensible barely registered on anyone's radar screen in America. He and his band -- Paul Gray on bass, Malcolm Dixon on organ and synthesizer, and Garrie Dreadful on drums -- became famous for the reckless abandon and prodigious musicianship of their live shows, which were spiced by the Captain's savage wit. In 1994 he released Live at the Milky Way, the best album of his solo career and one of the finest live albums of the era, followed by Meathead in 1995 and Mad Cows & Englishmen in 1996. With his reputation secured in particular by Live at the Milky Way, Captain Sensible remained a fan favourite while once again joining the ranks of the Damned in the 21st century, appearing on such Damned discs as 2001's Grave Disorder and 2008's So, Who's Paranoid?
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billy ocean

Billy Ocean is the biggest black recording star Britain has ever produced, one who has sold over 30 million records in his lifetime.

He has collected a pile of Gold and Platinum records across the world and hit the number one spot worldwide on pop charts including the USA, Australia, Germany, Holland, and the UK. Billy has achieved extraordinary success as both an artist and a songwriter

Born in Trinidad, Billy settled in London’s East End when just seven years old. The calypso crazy kid soon got turned on to soul singers like Otis Redding and Sam Cooke, as well as pop groups like The Beatles and The Rolling Stones, leading him to spend much of his study time in the music room.

Billy got his first break when he signed to GTO records, for whom his second single was the Motown-ish Love Really Hurts Without You, which reached No. 2 in the UK charts and No. 12 in the US.

After huge worldwide success and with a young family at home, Billy decided to take a break to spend some well earned time with them. In 2007, with the kids all grown up, Billy went back out to perform his hits again, this time with his daughter Cherie on backing vocals, with live dates in the UK and Europe, USA, Canada, and the Caribbean. The tour was a great success and culminated in his getting the bug once more for writing and recording. 2008 saw Billy back in the studio for the first time in 15 years, recording his brand new album ‘Because I Love You’ - which was released in 2009. 2010 saw Billy back on the road again with his band in the UK, Europe and the US and the release of ‘The Very Best of Billy Ocean’, which entered the UK album charts at number 17 and sold 72,000 copies in 4 weeks. Billy recently headed over to America where he played to fantastic crowds in Las Vegas, Detroit and Pennsylvania, Virginia and Florida.

He has continued to tour the world visiting Australia, New Zealand, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Dubai, Nigeria, as well as playing the UK , USA and Europe every year .
2015 sees him celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Release of the Suddenly Album which included the No 1 Hits in the US "Caribbean Queen " and Title track Suddenly with live dates across the globe.

Two top twenty singles followed; Love on Delivery and Stop Me, then Red Light Spells Danger became a smash in both the UK and the US.

howard jones

It was in 1983 that Howard Jones first burst upon the contemporary music scene and brought his very English song-writing and pioneering synthesizers to an unsuspecting world. Anyone who was around in the mid to late eighties will remember those high energy gigs and his first two albums Human’s Lib and Dream into Action. They lived in the higher reaches of the album charts in the UK, USA, Germany, Italy, Sweden, Canada, Australia and many other countries in the 1984-86 period and the hits kept coming……..New Song, What is Love?, Pearl in the Shell, Hide and Seek,(which he performed at Live Aid in 1985), Like to Get to Know You Well, Look Mama, Things Can only Get Better, Everlasting Love and the quintessential No One is To Blame, which reached No.1 in the US.

 

Now Howard Jones has re-mastered those first two classic albums ‘Human’s Lib’ and ‘Dream into Action’ and played them both live in their entirety for the first time on November 6th 2010 at the IndigO2 in London’s O2 Arena Complex. The re-mastered albums are available as a box set with a third bonus CD of rare material from the eighties. (www.howardjones.com)

 

A classically trained pianist, Jones applied his technique to the early synths particularly the Roland Juno 60, the Jupiter 8 and the Moog Prodigy. He also pioneered the classic Roland 808 drum machine and the Sequential Pro-One. In the early days he was triggering sequencers live on stage whilst playing and singing, something that no one had done before.

 

These days he still operates on the cutting edge of today’s technology and has been one of the leading exponents of the Roland Fantom G8 and the Roland V-piano.

 

Jones continues to tour extensively and will be playing multiple dates and festivals in 2011 with Robbie Bronnimann on live sequencing/sampling and effects using Ableton Live and various controllers, and Jonathan Atkinson on electronic drums.

 

Always one to take chances, Jones continues to write great songs inspired by his Buddhist beliefs as is evident on his latest studio album ‘Ordinary Heroes’ which features a string quartet on every track and one of the best Welsh male voice choirs in the world The Morriston on the song ‘Soon You’ll Go’.

 

But 2011 will mark the return of one of the true eighties icons and godfathers of modern electronic dance music in full electric mode.

If you were too young the first time around it’ll be a chance to find out where all those beats and sounds came from, and if you were around it’ll bring all those memories flooding back.

big country

Formed in 1981 by guitar playing founder members, the late Stuart Adamson and Bruce Watson, both native of the band’s hometown Dunfermline in Scotland. Initially driven by a shared vision of widescreen guitar melody, harmony and lyric, the classic Big Country sound was further enhanced later that summer by the arrival of drummer Mark Brzezicki and bass player Tony Butler. This is the Big Country that (with Producer Steve Lillywhite), recorded the classic debut album ‘The Crossing’ in 1983.

 

The band broke massively worldwide with the release of the album’s classic singles ‘Fields Of Fire’, ‘Chance’ and signature song ‘In A Big Country’, which went on to become massive worldwide hits, selling over 2 million copies and driving ‘The Crossing’ to 3 prestigious Grammy nominations in the USA.

 

 

 

The run of success continued throughout the 1980′s with the release of the anthemic single ‘Wonderland’ and the second album ‘Steeltown’ (1984), which debuted at Number 1 in the UK and contained the hit singles ‘East Of Eden, ‘Just a Shadow’ and ‘Where The Rose Is Sown’.

steve harley & cockney rebel

Formed in 1981 by guitar playing founder members, the late Stuart Adamson and Bruce Watson, both native of the band’s hometown Dunfermline in Scotland. Initially driven by a shared vision of widescreen guitar melody, harmony and lyric, the classic Big Country sound was further enhanced later that summer by the arrival of drummer Mark Brzezicki and bass player Tony Butler. This is the Big Country that (with Producer Steve Lillywhite), recorded the classic debut album ‘The Crossing’ in 1983.

 

The band broke massively worldwide with the release of the album’s classic singles ‘Fields Of Fire’, ‘Chance’ and signature song ‘In A Big Country’, which went on to become massive worldwide hits, selling over 2 million copies and driving ‘The Crossing’ to 3 prestigious Grammy nominations in the USA.

 

 

 

The run of success continued throughout the 1980′s with the release of the anthemic single ‘Wonderland’ and the second album ‘Steeltown’ (1984), which debuted at Number 1 in the UK and contained the hit singles ‘East Of Eden, ‘Just a Shadow’ and ‘Where The Rose Is Sown’.

the undertones

The Undertones emerged from Derry in 1976, the result of five friends learning how to play
basic rock and roll.
Even by the standards of that decade Derry was not the rock and roll capital of anywhere.
With no live bands worth watching,
they learned by listening to mail
order records, reading one of the few
copies of NME that made it to Derry
but most of all from listening to John
Peel’s wonderful show on BBC
Radio One.
Practicing in their bedrooms
eventually led to the band recording
‘Teenage Kicks’ in 1978 on Terri
Hooley's Good Vibrations label in
Belfast. The legendary DJ John Peel
received a copy and liked it so much
he played it twice in a row on his
radio show.
The Undertones signed with Sire Records and ‘Teenage Kicks’ was re-released, resulting in
the band's first appearance on Top Of The Pops. Over the next five years, John O Neill, his
younger brother Damian, Feargal Sharkey, Billy Doherty and Michael Bradley crafted further
numerous punkpop gems such as `Here Comes The Summer`, ‘Jimmy Jimmy`, `My Perfect
Cousin`, `You’ve Got My Number (Why Don’t You Use It)’ and ‘Wednesday Week’. They also
recorded four highly acclaimed LPs. Indeed, they almost enjoyed the life of professional
musicians. In 1983 Feargal Sharkey left the band to pursue a solo career and the remaining
members decided to call it a day. The Undertones were to remain silent for the next sixteen
years.
THE UNDERTONES – Part 2
In 1999 The Undertones reconvened, without Feargal Sharkey, to once again perform their
two-minute, three and a half chord songs to a new generation of fans in Derry. Fellow
Derryman Paul McLoone replaced Sharkey on vocals and his vocal prowess and electric
onstage presence soon convinced any doubters that he was more than capable of doing the
job.

After much consideration the band released an album of new songs called `Get What You
Need', which was critically acclaimed by Q magazine, Uncut, Rolling Stone and Hot Press.
Songs like ‘Thrill Me’, ‘I Need Your Love The Way It Used To Be’ and ‘Everything But You'
showed that the art of writing short, sharp songs had not been lost over the previous two
decades.
In 2003 ‘Thrill Me’ was released as a limited edition 7” vinyl single and found its way to John
Peel’s turntable. He introduced it on his show commenting, “And these are words I thought I
would never be saying on radio again, a new single from The Undertones”. He liked it so
much he played it twice, just as he did with ‘Teenage Kicks’ in 1978.
In 2007 the band recorded and released another collection of pop nuggets under the title
“Dig Yourself Deep” on the Cooking Vinyl label. The LP was described by Allmusic as 'a true
return to the classic sound of The Undertones’. Both ‘Get What You Need’ and ‘Dig Yourself
Deep’ had their digital release in December 2011.
The story of ‘Teenage Kicks’ was at the heart of the film 'Good Vibrations' in 2012, which told
the story of Terri Hooley and his record label. The band found themselves being portrayed by
five young actors who did their best with the Derry accent.
Since signing a licensing deal with Union Square Music, the four original LPs, ‘The
Undertones’, ‘Hypnotised’, ‘The Positive Touch’ and ‘The Sin Of Pride’ have been available
in digital and physical form, all with additional tracks and videos.
The band marked Record Store Day 2013 with a 7” vinyl only release, recorded in the
famous Toe Rag studio in London. A return to their punk roots, 'Much Too Late' sold out the
1,000 copies before the day was out.
2015 was one of the most successful and enjoyable so far, with shows across Europe and
around the UK in front of appreciative and wildly enthusiastic devotees.
2016 will mark the band’s 40th Anniversary. This will be celebrated with a variety of
scorching live performances at festivals and venues throughout the world along with some
very special record releases.

SUNDAY
OMD

Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (OMD) are an English electronic music band formed in Wirral, Merseyside in 1978. Spawned by earlier group The Id, the outfit is composed of co-founders Andy McCluskey (vocals, bass guitar) and Paul Humphreys (keyboards, vocals), along with Martin Cooper (various instruments) and Stuart Kershaw (drums); McCluskey is the only constant member. OMD released their influential debut single, "Electricity", in 1979, and gained popularity throughout Europe with the 1980 anti-war song "Enola Gay". The band achieved broader recognition via their seminal album Architecture & Morality (1981) and its three singles, all of which were international hits. Steadily resistant to celebrity status, the group earned acclaim for their adventurous recordings, which combined sonic experimentation and atypical subject matter with musical hooks.

Although retrospectively described as a challenging masterpiece, the avant-garde Dazzle Ships (1983) eroded European support. The band embraced a more straightforward pop sound on Junk Culture (1984), while continuing to experiment via newly acquired digital samplers; this change in direction led to greater success in the United States, and yielded the 1986 hit, "If You Leave". A year after the release of The Best of OMD (1988), creative differences rendered McCluskey the only remaining member of the group as Humphreys formed spin-off band The Listening Pool. OMD would return with a new line-up and explore the dance-pop genre: Sugar Tax (1991) and its initial singles were sizeable hits. By the mid 1990s, however, electronic music had been supplanted by alternative rock, and both OMD and The Listening Pool disbanded in 1996. McCluskey later conceived girl group Atomic Kitten, for whom he served as a principal songwriter, while Humphreys performed as half of the duo Onetwo.

bonnie tyler

With a career spanning four decades, and a voice instantly identifiable the world over, Bonnie is the international first lady of rock. Born in Skewen, Neath, South Wales, Tyler grew up listening to, and being influenced by, the legendary female artists of the day, especially Janis Joplin and Tina Turner.

Bonnie’s breakthrough hit was her second ever single “Lost In France” which climbed to No.9 in the UK charts. The track was then released in Europe and became a huge hit, staying in the Top Ten in Germany for over six months. “It’s A Heartache”, Bonnie’s next single was her first hit in the USA, reaching No. 3 in the Billboard chart, and was a massive hit all over the world.

The 80’s saw even greater success. A burgeoning collaboration with epic rock pioneer Jim Steinman garnered both Grammy Nomination and phenomenal international recognition with the album “Faster Than The Speed Of Night”, and multi-platinum selling power ballad “Total Eclipse Of The Heart”. Continuing their working relationship – “Holding Out For A Hero”, from the soundtrack to the film “Footloose”, proved similarly popular and has also featured in several other movies since including the Shrek series.

In the 90’s Tyler worked with “the German Simon Cowell” writer/producer Deiter Bohlen giving rise to albums including the monster German hit “Bitterblue”.

Bonnie was impacting the European market so much that in 2003 she recorded a dual-language cover of “Total Eclipse”, with French artist Kareen Antonn titled “Si demain (Turn Around)” which topped the charts in Belgium, Poland and France, the latter for ten weeks.

Both “It’s a Heartache” and “Total Eclipse of the Heart” are among the best-selling singles of all time, with sales in excess of six million. Bonnie’s work has earned her two Grammy Award nominations and three Brit Award nominations, among other accolades.

MIDGE URE

An artist who has received Ivor Novello, Grammy, BASCAP awards along with a flotilla of gold and platinum records, really needs very little introduction. Musical success is seldom measured in time spans of more than a few years, if not Andy Warhol's often quoted "fifteen minutes", so the fact that by the time Midge's single "If I Was" went to No1 in 1985 he had already crammed several musical lifetimes into a 10 year professional career speaks volumes - Slik, The Rich Kids, Thin Lizzy, Visage, Ultravox and of course the most famous one off group in musical history Band Aid had by then all had the guiding hand of his musical navigation.

 

Then you have to take account of Midge's musical directorship of a series of rock concerts for The Prince's Trust, Night of the Proms, Wicked Women for Breakthrough and in honour of Nelson Mandela; record production for Phil Lynott, Steve Harley and countless others; his video direction of memorable hits by the Fun Boy Three, Bananarama and others, or a whole swathe of landmark singles by Ultravox; TV, theatre and film music credits ranging from 'Max Headroom' to stage and big screen.

 

Midge appeared to the wider public in a moment of heady teen success with Slik. Their sway-along single 'Forever And Ever' took over at No.1 in the UK from Abba's 'Mamma Mia' on Valentine's Day 1976. Soon outgrowing Slik's pop dimensions, Midge was snapped up by ex-Sex Pistol Glen Matlock the following year for his new outfit, the Rich Kids, who charted amid an avalanche of press with a self-titled EMI single early in 1978. By 1979, with his name being added to many musicians' contact book, Ure had been asked by Billy Currie, Chris Cross and Warren Cann to become the new frontman in Ultravox.

 

The band was a major influence on the new romantic and electro-pop movements of the early '80s. Their successful trademark was combining Midge's powerful guitar riffs with sweeping synthesiser motifs, enigmatic imagery and state-of-the-art visuals. Tracks like 'Reap the Wild Wind', 'Dancing With Tears in My Eyes', 'Love's Great Adventure' and 1981's timeless 'Vienna' were all massive hits the world over as they charted with awesome regularity, not only on single, but with seven consecutive top ten albums in just six years. Indeed, Vienna recently was voted the Nation’s favourite number 2 single of the 80’s, finally granting it a coveted Number 1 position!

 

Even by then, the Midge Ure story had some individual chapters, of course. He wrote and produced “Fade to Grey” for Visage in 1980, then hit the top 10 in the summer of 1982 with his first release under his own name, an atmospheric take on the Tom Rush song made famous half a dozen years earlier by the Walker Brothers, 'No Regrets'.

Then came November 25, 1984, a historic day for Midge and all of pop music, as 36 artists by the collective name Band Aid gathered at SARM Studios in west London under Ure's production. They recorded 'Do They Know It's Christmas?' a song he had just written with Bob Geldof as the industry's heartfelt and eloquent contribution to Ethiopian famine relief. 600,000 copies sold in its first week in the UK alone was only the beginning: 800,000 more were bought in the second week, more than three million world-wide, and the unstoppable emotion engendered by the project led to Live Aid, the summer 1985 global concert that, all exaggeration aside, spoke for a generation.

Within months, a staggering £8 million had been raised for the starving in Africa, and Geldof said that without Ure's initial enthusiasm for the idea, not to mention his rapidly penned sketch for the single, neither Band Aid nor Live Aid could have happened.

 

Just two months after Live Aid, Midge was back at No.1 in Britain, this time under his own name, with 'If I Was', and by the autumn he had a No.2 solo album to accompany it, entitled 'The Gift'. Further solo albums followed with “Answers to Nothing” in 1988 and “Pure” in 1991 on BMG.

 

Delivered in 1994, the new 'Breathe' album was followed by further extensive touring. The Swatch campaign brought spectacular renewed international activity for the record in 1998. The album and eponymous single were subsequently in the top 20 throughout Europe for much of that year, and No.1 in Italy, Germany, Austria and Switzerland. 'Breathe' sold over half a million copies in Europe alone. Respected German composer Eberhard Schoener invited him to perform at the re-opening of the Potzdamer Platz in Berlin, in front of an estimated audience of 500,000.

 

Soon after Midge was busy producing and writing with and for various artists, both established and unsigned, at his studio in Bath, and writing music for films. Other duties included the 'Music for Montserrat' benefit at the Royal Albert Hall alongside Sir Paul McCartney, Elton John and Eric Clapton.

 

In 2005 Midge undertook both extensive acoustic tours of Germany and the UK as well as performing with the long standing "Night of the Proms" in Germany. This 21 date sell out tour of arenas saw a massive production with full orchestra and also starred Roger Daltry and Manfred Mann

 

He then went on to be executive producer for the Band Aid 20 single working with the likes of Paul McCartney, Joss Stone and Fran Healey.

 

Midge's services to both music and charity were finally recognised in the Birthday Honours list in 2005, when Midge was awarded a long overdue OBE. He also released his autobiography "If I Was" through Virgin books.

He's also received honorary doctorates from both Edinburgh and Dundee Universities, mainly in recognition for his work with Band Aid and Live 8. Midge actually managed to fit in a performance at the Edinburgh Live8 show in Murreyfield in July where he played with Eddie Izzard on piano! Surely a first!

 

Midge had long held an ambition to record an album of cover versions of songs that influenced him. He managed to record his own version of No Regrets in 1982, but it was to take 25 years and a change of format from LP to CD before he would record a full set of his favourite songs.

 

TEN was recorded in a log cabin in Eastern Canada during the long snow bound winter of 2007 - 2008 and was released again by German label Hypertension in September 2008.

The CD contains songs that influenced the teenage Ure when growing up in Glasgow in the 60s and 70s, so alongside the obvious (David Bowie) are the less obvious - The Carpenters...Lulu. These were the songs that had shaped him as a songwriter.

 

April 2009 saw the unthinkable happen - ULTRAVOX REFORMED and subsequently released a new album in 2012 and toured the UK and Europe culminating in the band being Special Guests of Simple Minds on their UK arena tour, ending at a sold out show at the O2 Arena, London.

 

Even with huge amounts of Ultravox activity, Midge still continued to perform in his own right, including tours of Australia and the US in 2013. The US tour was recorded and released as “Live in Chicago”. He also recorded an updated audio version of his autobiography “If I Was” and as someone who always enjoys pushing the boundaries of technology, this was released on flash drive in 2014. His radio work with Trevor Dann has also received a pat on the back with prestigious gold & silver New York Awards.

 

Fragile was released in 2014 and was a return to his progressive synth roots with soaring melodies and introspective lyrics. With collaborations by Schiller and Moby,was  playlisted by Radio 2 for 3 consecutive weeks.

 

2015, being the 20th anniversary of Breathe being completed, Midge decided to perform the album in it’s entirety for the first time. Ably accompanied by the boys from The India Electric Company, who had caught Midge’s attention at a show in 2013, the songs took on a new dimension and the show was a total success both with the critics and audiences throughout the UK and Europe. A live CD of the show was released by Oblivion/SPV.

 

Midge enjoyed playing with Joe and Cole so much that it seemed a natural progression to continue the format into 2016 with the Something from Everything tour, that went to Europe, the Middle East, Australia, New Zealand, Scandinavia, Ireland as well as the UK.

 

"I really enjoyed playing Breathe in it's entirety and there were some surprising successes! Album, tracks that I didn't really expect people to be aware of became the stars of the show, and this started me thinking about revisiting some older material that I never envisaged playing again as well as a raft of hits. Then I decided it would be a fun idea to play something from every album I have recorded right from the Rich Kids, via Visage and Ultravox, to my latest solo album, Fragile"

Britain’s Best Part Time Band was a series filmed and aired by the BBC during 2016, which Midge co-hosted with comedian Rhod Gilbert. He also started work on re-recording his classic hits rearranged for a live orchestra which is due to be released by BMG later this year.

 

Now it's time to go back to the electronic roots.

 

Time to lay down the acoustic setup and reunite with the synthesisers and electric guitars.

 

"I want to revisit some material that I've not really been able to perform with the recent acoustic line up, so you can expect to hear songs that haven't been aired for a while as well as the classics and a couple of surprises! I've really enjoyed touring with a band and now I want to expand back to a four piece and return to a more electronic based format"

HEAVEN 17

Heaven 17, please remember, were not even intended to be a group. In the beginning was the British Electric Foundation, or B.E.F., for short.  Born out of the collapse of the original Human League, and the brainchild of Martyn Ware, that band’s leader, B.E.F. was less a record label, as a portfolio of future musical projects of which Heaven 17 would be just one.  Ian Craig Marsh, co-founder of the Human League, would join Ware along with Glenn Gregory as lead vocalist the man who would have been the original Human League singer had he not been unavailable.

 

B.E.F. would produce the now iconic Music For Stowaways, and Music Of Quality and Distinction 1, and provided a template that subsequent artists would use from The Assembly in the Eighties, Electronic in the Nineties, and most recently, the Damon Alban and Jamie Hewlett project, Gorillaz.  But its Heaven 17 which would endure and help shape the future of modern music for over thirty years.  Their first album, Penthouse And Pavement, is, and remains, a modern classic.

 

It felt like a race to get the thing done really. There was no mediation involved. It literally was a lot of ideas coming out simultaneously but also with an intensity which meant that you could realise them very quickly. So it wasn’t just like a million ideas and actually three quarters of them were shit when you looked at them on the day – they were all pretty good I have to say. It was like opening a giant tap for a hose and it was just blasting out.  (Martyn Ware)

 

Within a week, they had written and demoed a new song, ‘(We Don’t Need That) Fascist Groove Thang.’  Listening back to a song written in late 1980, it’s astonishingly prescient.  The purely electronic template, the driving musical philosophy of the Human League, had been modified with the addition of funky slap-bass guitar, and treated dance-floor piano.  Released as a single, it became NME’s record of the week. The song managed to mention the words ‘fascist’, ‘Hitler’, ‘racist’ and was promptly banned from being played by the BBC.  ‘One of the reasons the BBC said it couldn’t be played was they thought Ronald Reagan could sue them over it’, said Ian Craig Marsh in 1981 about the song’s most controversial couplet: ‘Reagan’s president elect/Fascist god in motion.’

 

Penthouse and Pavement is a musically schizoid slab of modern art.  Side 1 fires off in the new, funky direction, whilst Side 2, the all-synth side gives a taste of what a third Human League album with Ware and Marsh on-side might have sounded – wonderful melodies and audacious arrangements with tracks such as ‘Let’s All Make A Bomb’ and ‘Song With No Name’ the very best of British electronica.

 

A defining feature of Heaven 17 was their total artistic control over their music.  Whereas the sound and the success of the Human League’s Dare was very much a collaboration between the band and Martin Rushent, Heaven 17 were performers, writers and designers creating not just their own music but every aspect of the music’s presentation and packaging.

 

It was written into our contract that we had complete control over the content of what we presented.  Each stage of production was integral to the band’s ethos, from cover artwork to their own sartorial elegance in video and on photo shoots. We were influenced by Kraftwerk because what they presented was this world view of which the music was an integrated part.  (Martyn Ware)

 

Heaven 17 and B.E.F. were unique and completely radical.  Simultaneously, a critique and a postmodern embodiment of early-Eighties corporatism, they were too clever by half for many who didn’t get the joke.  B.E.F., and Heaven 17 made it all into a straight-faced spoof of oppressive and unimaginative corporate industry, by creating one based on fun and intelligence’, says John Foxx, another electro pioneer of the Eighties:

 

No-one else was operating like that at the time. The nearest in spirit were perhaps the Residents or Devo, but they weren’t co-opting classic pop performers into their records. I was pleased they used my studio as base for a while – great to meet Tina Turner and Hank Marvin  - and Sandie Shaw, too.  Weird juxtapositions that made everyone look again.  It restarted Tina Turner’s career right away.  What a marvellous woman – dirtiest laugh I’ve ever heard.  They’d effectively deconstructed the notion of a band and thrown the door open to include everyone they admired, bringing all those genres into their world, and onto their records.  A very bright notion.  Generous and open hearted too. Not something you get a lot of in popular music.

 

Their next album, The Luxury Gap, was their pop masterpiece, the moment when everything just clicked into place to devastating effect.  The bands favourite-ever song, ‘Let Me Go’ so nearly broke them into the UK Top 40.  There would be no such disappoint with its follow up.  The band convinced their sceptical record company that ‘Temptation’ had to be the next single.  A duet between Glenn Gregory and Carol Kenyon, this song of lust, brilliantly framed by a musical structure which just kept building and building, Escher-like to an electric orgasm that seems never to come, it reached Number 2 in the UK charts in May 1983.  Martyn Ware:

 

Every gig we do, in any circumstances with any demographics, that song always works. I could play it on a guitar in a local pub and it would work.  I could do it on a tin whistle in St Kilda and it works!  I can talk to anyone I’ve never met before, any age almost, and they all know what it is.  It’s just bizarre.  You would be Abba if you could continue writing that over and over again.

 

In September 1983, Heaven 17 appeared on the front cover of Smash Hits, the teen pop bible, and now, sure evidence that they had now become part of the pop firmament.  ‘Come Live With Me’ the tale of a doomed love between a thirty-something and a teenager, and ‘Crushed By The Wheels Of Industry’, a sardonic look at mass unemployment set to a party beat cemented Heaven 17 as one of Britain’s most important post-punk bands.

 

For their next album, Heaven 17 pulled off that most difficult of tricks.  How Men Are was a set of experimental tracks which were also pop songs.  Although it spawned hits ‘Sunset Now’ and ‘This Is Mine’, the band’s popularity had peaked, and although they remained productive and always intelligent, Pleasure One (1986), and Teddy Bear, Duke, and Pyscho (1988) lacked direction.

 

With Ware now a successful producer for the likes of Tina Turner and Terrence Trent D’Arby, Heaven 17 was put on hold.  Bigger Than America, released in 1996 showed their muse returning, but it would be Beforeafter in the Noughties which would show the band back on top form.  ‘Hands Up To Heaven’ was a huge US Dance smash.

 

By the late 2000’s, Heaven 17 were down to two of their original members, Ian Craig Marsh having left the band to take a degree course in Psychology.  Yet demand for Heaven 17 live which had run dry a decade earlier had now picked up dramatically.  A whole new generation of artists began to sight Heaven 17 as prime influences, not least La Roux who would join Heaven 17 for a storming session for Six Music in 2010.

 

Heaven 17 then toured their classic album Penthouse and Pavement, with a power and fidelity, yet a contemporaneity which made the music as alive today as it was in 1981 with soul singer Billie Godfrey now an essential part of the live dynamic.  Heaven 17, who had largely refused to play live during the Eighties had re-invented themselves as a powerful live act.  Glenn had never sung better in his life.  On some nights, he would even play a cheeky acoustic version of that other Sheffield band’s biggest hit, ‘Don’t You Want Me.’ ‘Don’t tell anyone I can play the guitar;  it’ll ruin me electronic credentials’, Glenn told the audience at the Magna Centre in 2010.

The band would also play on Later…with Jools Holland to a rapturous reception, and would appear on BBC Children In Need.  The band’s highest profile year since the Eighties was capped off by a tongue-in-cheek appearance for Plusnet, a Sheffield-based broadband provider.

 

In October 2011, a reconstructed Music Of Quality And Distinction concert at the Roundhouse on night one (featuring original artists from the projects such as Sandie Shaw, and new talent such as Polly Scattergood) would be followed on the second by a dramatic reconstruction of their biggest commercial success, The Luxury Gap.

 

The Luxury Gap has never been more relevant.  Written during the height of Thatcherism by three Left-leaning young men against a backdrop of over 3 million unemployed the parallels with the Austerity Britain of today are obvious.  Today with a Millionaire cabinet, bankers’ bonuses, yet with once again three million unemployed and doom and depression everywhere, Heaven 17’s sly, post-modern critique of modern society has never sounded so resonant, nor been so necessary.

IMAGINATION

One of the most unique, genre defining and flamboyant soul groups of the past three decades Imagination will return on 7 October 2013 with Flashback: The Very Best of Imagination via Sony Music. Featuring 13 uplifting soul classics that helped cement Imagination’s dominance of the charts in the early 1980’s, the album also contains two brilliant new Imagination tracks, the first recorded as Imagination in over 25 years.

From the very opening bars of the oozing soul of ‘Body Talk’ through the sparkling and uplifting ‘Flashback’ and ‘Just An Illusion’, Imagination presented perfect pop songs for a more daring and experimental age. As lead singer and co-songwriter Leee John dressed in gold lame crawled his way on all fours, through the audience, and onto the Top Of The Pops stage, he secured Imagination’s position as essential 80’s crossover soul-dance hit-makers and influencers for future generations of pop stars.

Over the years, Leee John, the North London soulboy-made-good has created an impressive inventory of top-drawer projects as solo artist, songwriter and performer. However, for the release of Flashback: The Very Best of Imagination, he has returned to his roots, adding to the Imagination legacy of ‘Music and Lights’ and ‘In and Out of Love’ with the first new Imagination tracks for 25 years, bringing the story full circle. Ably demonstrating John’s rare vocal versatility, ‘The Truth’ is a bold and romantic ballad with gospel overtones, while ‘Krash (All Nite Long)’ echoes the vibe of Imagination’s hedonistic heyday.

Leee John is one of the hardest working men in music, touring both as Imagination and as Leee John dipping into the pop and jazz pool, he has his own radio show, has recorded songs for charity and is currently producing Flashback, a film of the history of British black music for which more than 80 interviews are already in the can, including Beverley Knight, Eddy Grant, Trevor Nelson, Omar, Geno Washington, Shalamar’s Jeffrey Daniels, Boney M’s Bobby Farrell and Ruby Turner.

wendy james

WENDY JAMES, born in London, is an English singer-songwriter notable for her work with band Transvision Vamp, collaboration with Elvis Costello, Solo work and further collaboration with James Williamson from Iggy & the Stooges, Lenny Kaye from The Patti Smith Group and James Sclavunos from Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.

doctor & the medics

Dr and the Medics were created IN 1982 almost at the dawn of the 80’s by Dr. Clive Thomas Jackson.

The band has had a very colourful and successful career as both recording artists and performers. Undoubtedly they are been best known for their massive 1986 No 1 “Spirit in the Sky,” which sold over 23 Million copies world wide and was number 1 in 19 countries!! They are also recognised as a great live act, in 1985 the NME referred to them as "THE live band of the year."

Often promoted as 1 hit wonders, the band claim to be the only 1 hit wonder to have had 2 hits as their next single “Burn,” got to number 21!! But as they don’t make documentaries or publish books about one and a half hit wonders, the Doctor wears his “One Hit Wonder” badge with pride!!!

The band’s last chart entry was “Waterloo” which they recorded with Roy Wood, In addition the band have recorded 5 albums, the latest being a live album featuring the current line up which is due out this year. This line up has been together since 1999 and has developed a unique and sensationally flamboyant live show. The current show features many hits from the 80’s, All given the Medics unique treatment!! Such is the power of their performance that they produced the shock result of the TV show "Hit Me Baby One More Time," when they won the studio vote for best act against Jackie Graham, Belinda Carlisle and....................... SHAKIN STEVENS!!!

In 2008 The Doctor was finally acknowledged by his home town when he was invited to perform to 8,000 people in the Liverpool Arena alongside Atomic Kitten, The lightening Seeds, The Christians, The Scafold, The Farm, Gerry and the Pacemakers and many more for the “Number 1 Project.”

In 2013 the band are as busy as ever. Always a great attraction at festivals they have a very busy summer. The Doctor has always pointed out that in 32 years they have never been on stage at a festival when it rains!! We look forward to seeing you soon, in the sunshine!!!

musical youth

The year was 1982 and with these triumphant words, five school kids from Birmingham named Dennis, Michael, Kelvin, Patrick and Junior launched themselves on an unsuspecting public and into pop and reggae history as ‘Pass the Dutchie’ surged to number 1 in the UK within two weeks of release and went on to sell over 5 million copies around the world.

‘Pass the Dutchie’ even went as far as reaching the Billboard 100 topping out at number 10 in the US chart, becoming reggae music’s first top 10 hit in that country. For the next three years the hits kept on coming as the boys brought reggae out of the ghettos and into pop mainstream with singles like ‘The Youth of Today’, ‘Never Gonna Give You Up’, ‘Heartbreaker’, ‘007’, ‘Tell Me Why’, and ‘Sixteen’ as well as two albums The Youth of Today’ and ‘Different Style’.

They toured throughout the world, exchanging numbers with Michael Jackson, and Motown legend Stevie Wonder wrote a song especially for them, Irene Carra (Flashdance) and Jody Wotley (Shalamar) both sang on Sixteen, whilst also duetting with Latoya Jackson. The band went on to record a fantastic song, ‘Unconditional Love’, with disco diva Donna Summer and also headlined at the world famous Montreaux Jazz Festival and Reggae Sunsplash.

Indeed, Musical Youth became the symbol of achievement, hope and pride for many other youths of all ages, creeds, nationalities and colour around the world as their combined talent and hard work reaped its reward and won them respect, culminating in being nominated for a Grammy award as best newcomers in 1984.

2012 represented 30 years since the release of ‘Pass The Dutchie’ and Musical Youth is now a duo in the form of Dennis Seaton (Vocals) and Michael Grant (Keyboards). They plan to celebrate this milestone with the release of a new album entitled ‘When Reggae Was King’ a collection of reggae songs, which inspired their generation and is also a celebration of reggae music throughout the world.

Dennis and Michael are looking forward to seeing all Musical Youth fans around the globe to celebrate the immortal words of ‘Pass The Dutchie’

THE BOOMTOWN RATS

Once famously described as ‘licentious, festering reprobates’ and ‘leprous anti-establishment scumbags’ and banned from playing in their home country, it’s difficult to overestimate the shock and awe The Boomtown Rats inspired in late 70s Ireland. Fronted by “one of Irelands greatest lyricists" (Hot Press), they set out to “disrupt, disturb and question what it meant to be young in the Ireland of the mid-70s”.

Formed in 1975 in Dublin The Boomtown Rats exploded out of Ireland in ’76 and their fast, loud, furious music and their fast loud furious attitude meant they became part of the burgeoning punk scene. Singer Bob Geldof’s defiant motormouth arrogance and flagrant disrespect for authority endeared him and his band to every youth who felt weighed down by the heavy handed blandishments of church and state. In the UK The Boomtown Rats first toured with the Ramones and Talking Heads rocking and mocking the status quo alongside the Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Jam and The Stranglers. They became one of the biggest bands of the late 70s/80s with a string of top ten hits and platinum albums, earning them Brit Awards, Ivor Novellos and Grammy Awards. Making history as the first Irish band to have a UK no 1 hit with ‘Rat Trap’, they went on to top the charts in 32 Countries with ‘I Don't Like Mondays’ and racked up 6 era-defining albums: ‘The Boomtown Rats’ (’77), ‘A Tonic For The Troops’ (’78), ‘The Fine Art Of Surfacing’ (’79), ‘Mondo Bongo’ (’80), ‘V Deep’ (’82) and ‘In The Long Grass’ (’84).

In 1984, inspired by a TV report on the famine in Ethiopia, Bob Geldof organized the star-studded Band Aid and co-wrote "Do They Know It's Christmas," one of the biggest-selling singles in history. The next year he organised Live Aid. In the intervening years Geldof’s profile as a campaigning spokesman may have overshadowed his music career, but the seeds of his activism can be heard in the grooves of all those Boomtown Rats’ hits and in his heart he’s just a humble song and dance man anyway.

Says Bob: “Age,curiosity and cash prompted our interest in getting together again. Curiosity about each other and what we did together in the '70' and 80's. Curiosity about those songs that seem to have endured and the music and band that powered them. When I sang again Rat Trap, Looking After No 1, Mondays, Someone's Looking At You, Banana Republic, She's So Modern etc, there was nothing I would change. On re-hearing, on re-singing them I understood that they could have been written yesterday. The circumstances within which they were written hadn't changed. Tragically and unfortunately I could sing those words with utter conviction. This isn't nostalgia, rather perhaps a time to be angry again. Time to go back to Boomtown. If only for a short while...”

soul ii soul

"We're from the days when a number 14 bus and a supermarket trolley got us around." Jazzie B remembers the lengths he and a school friend used to go to play dances with their first sound system when they were just 13 years old. It sums up the determination, resourcefulness and a love for music, that got Soul II Soul where it is today.

 

Their first North London sound system, Jah Rico, played mainly reggae, but after three years changed the vibe to more soul and funk and Soul II Soul was born. "We came up with the name not just because of the music we played, it also stood for Daddae and myself - two   souls moving together. We've always had that kind of relationship – there are not many words exchanged between us, but everything that’s happened has been very much in tandem."

 

Soul II Soul quickly achieved a name in their community, but were in no position to give up the day jobs, and at age 18, Jazzie was working for cockney pop legend Tommy Steele, as a tape operator. He found himself one of the few black people working in London’s recording   studio and recalls how this shaped his attitude: "It made me vexed in one way, but it made me see that there are parts of the industry that we're not taking care of because we always want to be so upfront." As Soul II Soul grew, Jazzie was determined to create a dancefloor environment that would appeal across the board.

 

Movin' Forward

 

Soul II Soul’s dances had been reflecting what was occurring naturally in London; kids of all races had grown up together and were now raving together. By the mid-1980s the warehouse scene was in full swing, vibrant and underground, removed from the constraints of the mainstream – a natural fit for Soul II Soul’s creativity: "We were very arty as an early sound. We never had conventional speakers, we used pyrotechnics in a dance, we had banners and strobes in a house party!"

 

Nothing summed them and their crowd up better than their regular Sunday night spot at the now legendary Africa Centre in London's    Covent Garden. This was truly the Soul II Soul experience, which, unlike other sound systems on the same circuit, wasn't just about the big name DJs, it was about a vibe. Jazzie remembers it as being unique: "You had people from all walks of life at the Africa Centre. A very  eclectic crowd. It was like Benetton down there!"

 

The Africa Centre was a game changer for Soul II Soul; for British black music; and for the nation’s youth culture in general. It caught the attention of Virgin Records, who signed them as an act in 1988, catapulting them into a tornado of success. The Soul II Soul sound was original, new, fresh, and infectious – above all, though, it was a UK thing. It represented what was going on all around it and alienated nobody. There was the Soul II Soul lifestyle too, with three shops in London selling clothing emblazoned with the Funki Dred logo, plus all manner of branded merchandising including clocks and jewellery. They even had a slogan "A happy face, a thumpin' bass, for a lovin' race."

 

Popular Demand

 

There were the resident club nights all over the world; live concert tours; radio and TV appearances; Jazzie had his own show on London's Kiss FM and there was even an Adventures of the Funki Dreds comic book. And, of course, Soul II Soul enjoyed the type of chart success – notably with Keep On Movin' and 'Back To Life' – that made them household names all over the world.

 

To date Soul II Soul have sold over 10 million albums in over 35 territories worldwide and have product on over 200 compilation CDs while Jazzie has accreditation on over 35 million albums in over 100 territories. They’ve performed in over 20 countries, and appeared at some of the most famous venues in the world including Wembley and New York's Universal Ample Theatre. America embraced Soul II Soul to such a degree, in 1990 they picked up two Grammy's. Jazzie was given the keys to seven cities in the US, including LA and New York, and the NAACP has honoured him. There's even a Soul II Soul day over there.

 

Into more recent times, musically Soul II Soul has kept itself contemporary – "Keep On Movin'' was used for the high profile Renault Clio television ads. Mary J. Blige and Sean Kingston have both released cover versions of "Back To Life'; while Beverly Knight released her version of "FairPlay" in 2011. A year later, "Back to Life" was featured in the Opening Ceremony of the London 2012 Olympics.

 

In 2008 there was royal recognition for the Funki Dreds when, after thirty years of dedication, Jazzie was awarded an OBE for services to music. The first sound man to be honoured by Her Majesty the Queen, and probably the most deserved investiture ever. Then in the same year Jazzie won the Ivor Novello Award for inspiration, and as he stepped up to accept the trophy he was announced as "the man who gave British black music a soul of its own". 2012 saw Soul II Soul receive the PRS for Music Heritage Award with a special plaque erected on The Electric (formerly The Fridge) in Brixton, where the group played their first live gig in 1991.

 

Bringing It Back Home

 

2013 has been the year it came back home for Soul II Soul – literally. In spring the clothing range’s Classics Collection took original artwork from the Funki Dred archives to reprint on modern fabrics, cut to contemporary shapes, designed around the rhythms of the dance. Jazzie himself was honoured by his birthplace – Finsbury Park – when local residents selected three distinguished locals of the area for their contribution and inspiration to the community. An ironwork sculpture of him now stands at the Portrait Bench by the station forecourt, alongside suffragette Edith Garrud and health pioneer Florence Keen. The year finished on a high, when, as curtain-raiser to Soul II Soul’s 25th Anniversary in 2014, they performed a series of full band, old school-style gigs all over the UK.

 

For the man who considers himself as a "pleasure giver", it's paramount to Jazzie to remain a part of the club scene. "Being a sound system  is very important to me, I still DJ in clubs. And the label is run like a sound system. It's all exactly the same as before, except that the times have changed. Technically we are still a sound system. The singers and artists are our MCs, and instead of mix tapes we now make records and CDs."

 

Jazzie B no longer borrows supermarket trolleys and hasn't seen the inside of a number 14 bus for a while, but the sound system mentality   is still very much at the root of Soul II Soul, keeping him in touch with their continually evolving audience.

HUE & CRY

The 1980s were a breeding ground for new talent in the UK, with pop music experiencing a figurative renaissance period. Dance music was combining four-to-the-floor beats with pop and becoming the club scene music of choice, taking over from disco and separating itself from the ballads of acts such as Bonnie Tyler and Rod Stewart. Synthesised horns and drums were replacing their real counterparts. Fashion and image were at the forefront.

 

Two brothers, Patrick and Gregory Kane hailing from Coatbridge, Scotland were active in the explosion of popular culture. Greg was a classically trained pianist who had talents in numerous other instruments, and in the early 80s whilst playing in a few Scottish pop bands, he was simultaneously honing in on a sound with his brother Pat (who at the time was studying English Language, Literature and Film & Television Studies at Glasgow University) that would later become what we now know as Hue and Cry.

 

After shopping around for a record label (settling on the fledgling London label Circa Records) and releasing a few sleeper singles, the brothers finally hit the charts with a song from their debut album ‘Seduced and Abandoned’ entitled ‘Labour Of Love’. Musically, the song was apropos of the growing dance-pop scene, with Greg hammering a funky piano line beneath Pat’s lightning fast rap-esque vocals. Backed by synths and a huge reverb drenched snare, it retained a soulful edge which would later become part of their signature sound.

 

‘Labour Of Love’ hit the charts, partly with help from the band Los Lobos failure to perform on Top Of The Pops due to visa problems. Hue and Cry were brought over to fill in, generating massive exposure for them and elevating them to #6 in the charts. The song was a coded anti-Thatcherite anthem, and would become the soundtrack to the General Election campaign in 1987 Britain. Pat and Greg suddenly found themselves shot into the public eye, and opened concerts for Madonna (180,000 over three nights at Wembley), Simply Red and U2 during 1987-88.

 

‘Labour Of Love’ was followed by two smash hits from their second album ‘Remote’, entitled ‘Looking For Linda’ and ‘Violently’. To the delight and surprise of the Kane brothers, the band had become a commercial success, however Hue and Cry were unfortunately dropped from the label after the release of their third album Stars Crash Down, as Circa went through a shift in ownership resulting in a difference in creative outlook from the band.

 

Hue and Cry have never been a band governed by the expectations of their followers, so with the freedom to create without the controlling, watchful eye of a record label, the band took an experimental leap forward into the 90’s, creating a number of albums (‘Truth and Love’, ‘Showtime!’ and ‘Piano & Voice’) that infused jazz, drum 'n' bass, R&B and Nuyorican Latin-funk. Later that decade they signed to the Scottish jazz and classical record label Linn Records for their 1996 album ‘Jazz Not Jazz’ and 1999 album ‘Next Move’. These two releases turned out to be the last for Hue and Cry before an amicable split.

friday
roachford

Ever since bulldozing his way onto the scene with unforgettable tracks like ‘Cuddly Toy’ and ‘Family Man’ in the late 80s, Andrew Roachford’s maverick take on music has spread far and wide. As the first artist to sign a staggering seven-album deal with Columbia Records, it heralded the beginning of something big. “Getting signed and being a black British artist gave me a sense of pride” enthuses Andrew.

Like any artist worth their salt, Andrew Roachford’s music is the result of many things. Raised in south London to West Indian parents, as a child of the 70s and 80s, it’s no wonder that his music sounds the way it does. Influenced by everyone from Al Green, Michael Jackson to David Bowie Andrew’s formative years were also spent listening to Radio One, reggae and jazz. Pinpointing the beginning of his musical career as a child he vividly remembers being mysteriously drawn from his bed to play the piano in his living room. “There was always a piano in the house and I just got up and started playing even though I’d never played before. There was something quite surreal and magical about it.” Looking at Andrew Roachford’s family history, though, it shouldn’t come as any surprise.

Born into a musical dynasty, his uncle Bill Roachford was a virtuoso saxophonist. The musical ball really started to roll however, when Andrew hit the road with his uncle. Playing gigs on the jazz circuit in those days, gave him a good grounding for things to come. “I got lucky enough to start gigging when I was about 14.  I was in the middle of that whole jazz scene which was an interesting education. It taught me musically, how to listen and how to entertain. My uncle always told me that you had to give people a show.”

Andrew was Columbia’s biggest selling domestic act for over ten years. As if any more proof were needed, the fact that Andrew Roachford has been approached by such luminaries as Michael Jackson and Chaka Khan to write songs, speaks volumes.

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